What Does A Uterine Fibroid Look Like

Fibroids Miracle
OPRAH TAKES AN ANATOMY CLASS ...

They Say What a€œia€ Have in My Womb is a Uterine Fibroid

Author: Esteri Maina

We are all feminine yes, but we are different, which is why today many sisters around the globe have had to persevere such a statement as the one shown above from their gynecologists.

Frankly it is not easy for a woman to try to have a child, gets pregnant but just when the delivery is near, the doctors give her a shock of her lifetime-that a uterine fibroid in her uterine walls will complicate the process.

If these horrible growths have nothing to do with giving birth, then it will be other complication like heavy, extra painful and irregular periods.

Brief background information

Reliable research by gynecologists states that presence of increased levels of estrogen in pregnancy cause radical increase in size of fibroids.

It then shrinks back to normal only after the child is born. These range from the size of a quarter inch to that of a cantaloupe, which is why the uterus grows to a size of a five-month pregnancy.

These many not be just one, but may be many but do not always cause symptoms, their location and sizes in some women causes the discomfort in the lower abdomen and heavy bleeding.

Additionally, they may grow on the outer surface of the uterus, within its walls or attached to it by a stem like a structure.

Their exact causes are unclear but there is an observation that these could be connected to the both genetic predisposition and hormonal stimulation.

Most apparent signs

Depending on the number, their location and sizes, uterine fibroids may cause some or all of the following signs.

Pelvic pain and pressure or heaviness resulting from the bulk or weight of the fibroids pressing on the close parts is common.

Stop Fibroids

It may also be felt on the back and legs due to the pressure the fibroids cause to the nerves.

Uncomfortable and uncommon pain during sexual relations as well. Pressure may be exerted on the bladder leading to constant urge to urinate.

If the same happens to the bowels, one may have constipation and that bloating feel and then abdominal enlargement.

Some women do experience heavy prolonged periods that are also irregular and at times blood clotting may cause to anemia.

Types of uterine fibroids

Subserosal fibroids are not known to cause period malfunctions but the pelvic pain associated to generalized pressure.

They are the kind that grows under the outside covering of the uterus; it expands outwards through the wall, giving it a distorted appearance.

They can also develop a stem making it hand to distinguish them from an ovarian mass.

Intramural fibroids develop within the uterus lining expanding inwards and at the same time expanding its size. These make it feel larger than usual size and are closely linked with menstrual problems as well as back pain.

Sub mucosal fibroids can be found under the lining of the uterus and they are rare, but if present may lead to heavy blood surging, heavy and extended periods.

Detection

Doctors detect fibroids via abdominal ultrasound, which is a painless process in which a radiologist moves a receiver or transducer about the size and shape of a computer mouse across the abdominal surface.

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE FOLLOWING THE LINK BELOW

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/womens-health-articles/they-say-what-i-have-in-my-womb-is-a-uterine-fibroid-767333.html

About the Author

An original article by Esteri Maina onFIBROIDS


This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

10 Responses to What Does A Uterine Fibroid Look Like

  1. staygold says:

    uterine Fibroid Removal?
    I had a large uterine fibroid removed on April 22. The fibroid was large 10.5 cm, so they did it by an incision cut (from my belly button down to the top of my vagina). The first week and 1/2 were painful, but now I’m up, walking around doing pretty normal activities. Went to my post-op visit, and the pathology was normal/benign (orig. they were worried it was cancer because the tumor grew so big so fast). But I’m ok, and the stitches had dissolved. The Dr. performed and internal exam and said everything looked fine and that for the next two to three months it’s normal to feel a little “off” down there.
    Well other than the scar healing and the skin being a bit bruised and tightened I was feeling fine. Now I constantly feel bloated. I feel like my colon is always filled with pressure and gas. I don’t know if this is what she means by “off” and it’s normal after major abdominal surgery or if I should call and make another appt?

    • JUICY says:

      I had a c-section and also a fibroid that they removed. It’s normal to feel like the doctor said “off” for a couple of months. Everything has to settle back to where it was. My doctor recommended that I get checked every 6-12 months to see if it grows back. Wait awhile before you go back unless your in deep pain. YOU JUST HAD SURGERY.

  2. staygold says:

    Uterine Fibroid Removal?
    I had a large uterine fibroid removed on April 22. The fibroid was large 10.5 cm, so they did it by an incision cut (from my belly button down to the top of my vagina). The first week and 1/2 were painful, but now I’m up, walking around doing pretty normal activities. Went to my post-op visit, and the pathology was normal/benign (orig. they were worried it was cancer because the tumor grew so big so fast). But I’m ok, and the stitches had dissolved. The Dr. performed and internal exam and said everything looked fine and that for the next two to three months it’s normal to feel a little “off” down there.
    Well other than the scar healing and the skin being a bit bruised and tightened I was feeling fine. Now I constantly feel bloated. I feel like my colon is always filled with pressure and gas. I don’t know if this is what she means by “off” and it’s normal after major abdominal surgery or if I should call and make another appt?

    • norton g says:

      There’s likely no connection between your fibroid removal operation and your present feelings of bloat. Try avoiding any carbonated drinks, like soda. Sometimes ice cream or other lactose items in the diet can produce bloat, in which case over-the-counter lactrase tablets taken with dairy foods can be of help. Also try avoiding any very spicy foods. You might also just be swallowing a lot of air. If this doesn’t work, see your surgeon again.

  3. Anon Speaker says:

    Abdominal Myomectomy for Uterine Fibroid Tumors?
    I have done my research, so I am really looking for answers based on the personal experience of other women. PLEASE, serious responses only.

    Background: I’m 34 and I have uterine fibroid tumors, diagnosed by internal ultrasound. 2 of the 3 are quite large. 1 is pedunculated. I know that small, asymptomatic fibroids are commonly left untreated, but in my case, my doctor recommends removal because of the size and my symptoms. My symptoms include pain, enlarged abdomen, bladder/urinary issues, pain during intercourse and even tampon use, dysfunctional vaginal bleeding (like a period, but for 2+ wks of the month, in addition to my week-long, heavy period), etc. My doctor also recommends surgery because removal will increase my chances (from my current state) of being able to conceive later.

    In my case, my doctor determined that the only surgery available to me is abdominal myomectomy. (There are less evasive treatments including medications and laparoscopy, but I do not qualify for them.) This surgery involves a 4-5″ horizontal incision in my abdomen and an incision in the uterine wall once the uterus is lifted out through the incision. If I am later able to conceive, and if I successfully carry a child near term, I will have to have a planned C-section birth a few weeks early due to the weakening of the uterine wall.

    I know there are risks as with any surgery (blood loss, anesthesia issues, etc.). The possible complications for this specific surgery include infertilization, unexpected hysterectomy, excessive scar tissue, recurrence of the fibroids, etc. For me, my desire for a normal quality of life and my hope of having children both outweigh the risks.

    My questions are:

    (1) How long will this surgery take to recover (i.e., when may I walk and sleep without excruciating pain, return to the desk part of my job, exercise – cardio, situps)? My research says it takes 2-6 weeks to return to work, varying from person to person. I am healthy, relatively active, and have a fairly high tolerance of pain. Can anyone similar to me describe the approximate recovery time?

    (2) What other personal experience can you share (i.e., post-surgery pregnancy, infertilization, surgery complications, recurrence, pregnancy complications/miscarriage, etc.)?

    (3) If you did experience infertilization (not caused by unexpected hysterectomy), is In Vitro still an option?

    THANK YOU!!

  4. Ann G says:

    Connection between ovarian cyst and fibroid?
    an ultrasound i has found a ovarian cyst and a uterine fibroid. i am having another ultrasound next week to check the cyst again. if it ends up being something serious like cancer is the fibroid a sign that it could have spread to the uterus or are fibroids all together different? i have just been feeling so blah lately and have this bad feeling that something is really wrong, at the same time i think it these feelings might just be nerves and all be put on by anxiety. i initially went to the doctor for back pain and had a ct scan that led to a ultrasound led to this. I never really put all the symptoms together until now so i haven’t discussed them with the doctor. i looked up the symptoms for ovarian cancer and i have all of them. i am newly separated from m y husband and am now scared of what i will do if i do end up having cancer. i feel like if i go to the doctor now and say i have all these symptoms i will sound like i am just making them up from reading on it. what is the best thing to take for indigestion and bloating? i have tried tums and prilosec and midol but nothing is helping anymore

    • Panda says:

      No one can answer your specific question. You will need to go back to your doctor, be honest with him and tell him exactly what you are experiencing and how you feel. Let him examine you and come to his own conclusions.

  5. Ann G says:

    connection between ovarian cyst and fibroid?
    an ultrasound i has found a ovarian cyst and a uterine fibroid. i am having another ultrasound next week to check the cyst again. if it ends up being something serious like cancer is the fibroid a sign that it could have spread to the uterus or are fibroids all together different? i have just been feeling so blah lately and have this bad feeling that something is really wrong, at the same time i think it these feelings might just be nerves and all be put on by anxiety. i initially went to the doctor for back pain and had a ct scan that led to a ultrasound led to this. I never really put all the symptoms together until now so i haven’t discussed them with the doctor. i looked up the symptoms for ovarian cancer and i have all of them. i am newly separated from m y husband and am now scared of what i will do if i do end up having cancer. i feel like if i go to the doctor now and say i have all these symptoms i will sound like i am just making them up from reading on it. what is the best thing to take for indigestion and bloating? i have tried tums and prilosec and midol but nothing is helping anymore.

    • Gee says:

      An ovarian cyst is a fluid sack attached to your one of your ovaries and a fibroid is a solid. Most fibroids are small growths of knotty connective tissue that develop in different ways and are almost always benign. Fibroids are common with women and in some cases hereditary. They can be extremely painful even though benign and cause many problems. You will get tremendous relief once they are removed. They sometime come back thou

Leave a Reply